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DRASTIC CHANGES TO VETERANS PENSION BENEFITS COMING OCTOBER 18, 2018

Veterans BenefitsOn, September 18th, 2018, the Veterans Administration (VA) released the long anticipated updated VA regulations regarding Veterans Pension Benefits.

On October 18, 2018, new rules will go into effect that will make qualifying for the Pension Benefit (also known as “Aid and Attendance”) very challenging. The Pension Benefit helps pay for un-reimbursed medical expenses (not covered by Medicare or a Medicare Supplement) for Veterans and their surviving spouse.  The new regulations will make this benefit available to fewer Veterans and/or their spouses.

If you are a Veteran or the surviving spouse of a Veteran:

    • Who served in ACTIVE (not reserve) duty during any of these periods of war:
      • World War II – December 7, 1941 to December 31, 1946
      • Korean War – June 27, 1950 to January 31, 1955
      • Vietnam War – February 28, 1961 if Served in Vietnam or August 5, 1964 to May 7, 1975
      • Persian Gulf War – August 2, 1990 continues through today
    • And you feel you may need assistance with dressing, bathing, getting in and out of a bed or chair, feeding or toileting within the next 3 years…

It is in your best interest to call us IMMEDIATELY!

We are alerting you to these changes so that you may have an opportunity to create a trust and transfer assets into the trust BEFORE the new regulations are put into place, thereby, avoiding the new restrictions.

A VERY LIMITED NUMBER OF TRUSTS CAN BE COMPLETED BEFORE THE CHANGES TAKE EFFECT!

A VERY LIMITED NUMBER of Veteran Trusts can realistically be completed due to the need for an initial conference, designing the trust, signing the trust, and for you to have time to transfer your assets into the name of the trust before the rules change and these horrible new regulations go into place.

THE NEW REGULATIONS ARE LIFE CHANGING!

Please understand we are not trying to “drum up business.”  What we are trying to do is WARN people we have previously talked to that did not want to set up a Veteran Trust in the past because they felt they had time.  We want you to know and understand TIME is RUNNING OUT!   There is no longer the possibility of waiting to set up a trust until you or your loved ones needs care!  We have special relationships with our Veteran clients and we have always been advocates for Veterans to get the benefits they deserve.

The same thing happened in 2008 when Medicaid regulations became more restrictive.  Those who acted QUICKLY were able to save tens of thousands, sometimes hundreds of thousands of dollars.  Setting up a Veteran Trust NOW could mean the difference between having enough money to afford assisted living instead of moving to a nursing home.

DON’T DELAY!

Call Vouga Elder Law & Estate Planning TODAY at 636-394-0009 to schedule

 

 

VA News – NEW Presumptive Conditions for Camp Lejeune

Washington- The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) has published regulations to establish presumptions for the service connection of eight diseases associated with exposure to contaminants in the water supply at Camp Lejeune, N.C.

The presumption of service connection applies to active duty, reserve and National Guard members who served at Camp Lejeune for a minimum of 30 days (cumulative) between August 1, 1953 and December 31, 1987, and are diagnosed with any of the following conditions:

  • Adult leukemia
  • Aplastic anemia/other myelodysplastic syndromes
  • Bladder, kidney or liver cancer
  • Multipole myeloma
  • Non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma
  • Parkinson’s disease

“We have a responsibility to take care of those who have served our Nation and have been exposed to harm as a result of that service,” said Secretary of Veterans Affairs Robert A. McDonald.  “Establishing a presumption for service at Camp Lejeune will make it easier on those Veterans to receive the care and benefits they earned.”

Environmental health experts in VA’s Technical Workgroup conducted comprehensive reviews of scientific evidence, which included analysis and research done by the Department of Health and Human Service’s Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR), the Environmental Protection Agency, the International Agency for Research on Cancer, the National Toxicology Program, and the National Academies of Science.

Veterans with 30 or more cumulative days of active duty service, at Camp Lejeune during the contamination period are already eligible for certain medical benefits, following passage of the Honoring America’s Veterans and Caring for Camp Lejeune Families Act of 2012.

In the early 1980’s volatile organic compounds, trichloroethylene (TCE), a metal degreaser, and perchloroethylene (PCE), a dry cleaning agent, as well as benzene and vinyl chloride, were discovered in two on-base water supply systems at Camp Lejeune.  The contaminated wells supplying the water systems were shut down in February 1985.

This area included in this presumption is all of Camp Lejeune and MCAS New River, including satellite camps and housing areas.

The rule will be effective either 60 days after publication in the Federal Register, or following conclusion of the 60-day Congressional Review, whichever is later.

If you or a loved one was at Camp Lejeune during those dates or have more questions, please call us to set up an appointment at 636-394-0009

 

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Long Term Care Conversation Checklist for Families and Seniors

Having a conversation about long-term care with an aging loved one can be very difficult.  Initiating a conversation can be awkward or uncomfortable for family members or caregivers.  We offer the following hints that may help to begin a conversation about long-term care with your loved one.

A good conversation starter is to ask when their legal documents have last been reviewed

Asking this simple question is a good way to get everyone thinking about the future.  Many seniors believe that it isn’t necessary to review documents – “Oh I had those prepared years ago….I’m set.”  Helping the senior realize their life has “probably changed a lot since they were prepared” is a way to ease into “other changes” you have noticed. As we age, just like our health care needs change (we tend to take more prescriptions), our housing needs change (we don’t enjoy the 2 story house anymore), so do our legal needs change.

When you are 18, you need a Durable Power of Attorney for Health Care so someone can make health care decisions for you if you can’t.  When you have a house and are raising a family, a Revocable Living Trust is what is needed to handle a serious accident, health care crisis or an untimely death.  When we become a senior and retire, we need to protect our home and assets against the tremendous cost of long term care and estate recovery.

If your loved one says they have no legal documents or they have “a Will”, NOW, before they have a medical emergency or lose mental capacity, is the time to avoid unnecessary legal headaches and fees by getting powerful documents in place, like “The 3 Most Important Documents”.

The most important documents everyone should have over the age of 18

A Durable Power of Attorney (for finances) appoints someone to act on your behalf if you are no longer capable of handling your finances.  Without a valid and powerful Durable Power of Attorney, the family will be forced to apply for a Conservatorship through the Probate Court to pay bills and handle investments.  Without having in writing who you wish to handle your affairs, the Court may appoint someone you would not have chosen to handle things for you.  A powerful and properly drawn Durable Power of Attorney will allow the person you appoint to protect assets for your quality of life and quality of care.

A Durable Power of Attorney for Health Care Decisions appoints someone to act on your behalf to make health care decisions for you if you are no longer capable of making them yourself.  Without this document in place, the family will be forced to apply for a Guardianship through the Probate Court to make health care decisions for you.  This is vitally important if it is your desire NOT to be kept alive by artificial nutrition and hydration.

The Probate Court requires a surety Bond for the person appointed Conservator and/or Guardian.  The Bond is based on the amount of assets owned by you.  It must be renewed annually and is VERY expensive and very cumbersome.  A Conservatorship and Guardianship lasts the rest of your life, requiring two annual filings with the Probate Court (continued legal fees) and the Court must approve every dollar spent for, or on, your behalf.  The attorney’s fees for a Conservatorship and/or Guardianship, in the FIRST YEAR alone average between $5,000 and $10,000.

If your loved one wishes to avoid a Probate Estate after their passing, they must have some type of a Trust in place.  A Last Will and Testament still goes through Probate.  A Revocable Living Trust avoids Probate, but does not protect any assets from being spent on the cost of long term care and does not protect their home against Estate Recovery.  A Beneficiary Deed does not protect against Estate Recovery either.

ONLY an Asset Protection Trust, and/or some form of long term care insurance, avoids all of your loved one’s assets from being spent on a nursing home and their home being subject to Estate Recovery by the state.  This type of planning is extremely complex and requires consulting with an Elder Law Attorney.

Please call us at 636-394-0009, to see if you are eligible for a FREE no-obligation conference.

Determine if it’s time to think about long-term care assistance

Reasons to seek long-term care can vary from person to person.  Long-term care is not just about a potentially more comfortable and safer environment for your aging loved one. Long term care can and may be necessary for the mental and physical health of the elder, and for the caregiver.

To ensure your loved one is able to consider their options without feeling confrontational, introduce alternative housing options as early as possible, even when you think your loved one might be in the early stages of needing help. Ask your loved one questions about lifestyle or health-related challenges to introduce the idea that either a home-care provider or senior living community may be a positive choice.  Continuing to engage in this conversation over time by sharing your observations, concerns, and any physical or mental challenges you may notice may make the transition easier when it is time.

Remain sensitive to your loved one’s needs

Discussing long-term care may be intimidating for you, but it is a difficult topic for your loved one as well.  Most of us want to do everything possible to stay in our home as long as possible.  Since any decisions that are made will affect your loved one the most, it’s crucial to respect their needs and preferences.  Involve your loved one in as many discussions and meetings as possible, barring any health restrictions.  Being left out of a family meeting or doctor’s conference could foster feelings of exclusion or distrust.

Allow time for your loved one to become open and adjust to the idea.  If there are no immediate health risks, allow your loved one to set the pace for the discussions.  Make an effort to find solutions that will work for everyone involved.  For example, if your loved one feels strongly about maintaining a garden in a new home, expand your search for communities that would be able to provide gardening opportunities.

Some communities have Alzheimer’s patients separate from seniors who just need assisted living.  If your loved one has Alzheimer’s make sure you check into those communities with memory care.

Below you will find a checklist of different symptoms that you may have noticed your loved one is experiencing.  If there are several family members that are around your loved one on a regular basis, it might be good to discuss the symptoms they have noticed and compare with what you have seen.

Physical Symptoms

□  Are they able to move around easily given the physical layout of the home? For example, are stairs, carpet, bath/shower or door handles obstacles for mobility? Is the heating and lighting adequate for any sensory impairment including hearing, sight and circulations problems?

□   Are they experiencing balance issues, especially when changing positions? Are you concerned about them falling?

□   If they fell, are you confident he or she would be able to call for help? Is there a reliable source to respond to a call at all times? If they are living alone, is it time to think about LifeAlert?

□   Are they experiencing frequent incontinence? Can they attend to the problem when this happens or is help needed?

□   Is your loved one experiencing frequent, significant sleep disturbances?

□   Are they capable of shopping for and cooking or preparing healthy meals?

□   Do they have trouble operating gadgets or appliances such as a can opener, microwave, stove or telephone?

□   Are finances such as bill payments, deposits, and investments being handled in a timely manner?

□   Is your loved one still driving? If so, are you concerned about his/her and others well being?  Is public transportation a safe and viable option?

□   Are they capable and are they adequately doing housekeeping, laundry and wearing clean clothes?

□   Are they bathing regularly?

□   Are prescribed medications obtained and consistently taken as indicated?

Mental Symptoms

Is your loved one demonstrating personality changes, including, but not limited to:

□   Frequent irritability?

□   Insensitivity to others?

□   Disoriented to place and time?

□   Aggressive behaviors?

□   Repetitive behaviors?

□   Communication with inappropriate language?

□   Is your loved one socially withdrawn and not able or not wanting to get together with friends or family?  Are there signs of depression?

□   Do they express negative comments about him or herself?

□   Are they demonstrating an inability to make sound decisions or use good judgment?

□   Is your loved one able to understand communication or instructions from others?

Schedule a family meeting

A family meeting can move the topic of long-term care to a more focused discussion that can lead to a plan.  If your loved one agrees, here is a checklist for planning for your family meeting:

□   Determine the family members that should be involved directly or indirectly in decision making.  Always include your loved one if he/she is capable of taking part in any decision making.

□   Consider including an independent third party to play the role of mediator.  This could be a minister or other member of the clergy, a social worker, or a case manager.  If necessary, find a neutral place to hold the meeting.

□   Prepare an agenda to help you stay focused.  It may include the following:

~ A medical update

~ Sharing of feelings about the illness and caregiving

~ Daily caregiving needs

~ Financial concerns

~ Who will make decisions – are there legal documents in place for decision making

~ If there are no legal documents in place, call us at 636-394-0009, to schedule an FREE,  no-obligation conference to discuss what options are best for your loved one and family

~ What support role each person will play

~ What support the primary caregiver needs

~ What you consider the next steps of moving forward should be

~ If you are around more than other members of the family write down what you have noticed in terms of declining health or memory issues that other family members might not notice.

Continue to involve the family

The move to a long-term care community is an immense transition for any family, so it’s important to involve everyone relevant to the person(s) being moved.

Reach out to siblings to secure their input and support.  For example, share online information about long-term care communities to secure greater involvement and participation.

Is there an unequal financial or time burden to one family member? If so, acknowledge the distribution of resources and discuss a strategy for achieving a balance that appeals to everyone.

Continue to engage your parent or loved one

Have ongoing conversations at time when your loved one is feeling best and there are few distractions.

Introduce the idea of an overnight visit to a long-term care community or an extended afternoon visit to get a feel for the various available options.

Begin researching long-term care options in your area.

□   Go to snapforseniors.com to access a nationwide senior housing database.

□   Call and request a consultation with those communities that interest you.

□ Ask family members to help you prepare a list of questions and concerns for your specific situation with your loved one.

We have checklists for Home Care and Home Health Care Providers and an Assisted Living Community cost checklist available in our Resource Center. 

Stop by anytime Monday – Friday, 8:30am – 5:00pm to browse our resources.

May is National Elder Law Month!

Many people prepare for death by having a Will or Trust drawn up.  But the real question is,

“What if I don’t die, but get sick and need care?”

Are you, your family and your assets  protected? Come to one of our free workshops and learn what can  happen to you or your clients if you aren’t prepared.

We always encourage people to “get there ducks in a row” and make sure all of their legal documents are up to date and work for each individual’s Elder Care Journey.  We believe above all other legal documents you need to make sure you have The 3 Most Important Documents. That includes a Durable Power of Attorney, a Durable Power of Attorney for Health Care and HIPAA documents.

Call us today at 636-394-0009 to register for a workshop or to learn more, or if you would like to learn more about the Elder Care Journey or The 3 Most Important Documents.

 

National Healthcare Decisions Day

April 16th is National Healthcare Decisions Day

 The goal is to inspire, educate and empower the public and providers about the importance of advance care planning.

Nobody wakes up and says:

“I think I’ll have a stroke today.” 

Don’t get stuck with inadequate documents.  Make sure your Durable Power of Attorney and Health Care Durable Power of Attorney are powerful yet flexible to take care of whatever life throws at you.  Don’t forget we review    Durable Powers of Attorney and Health Care Durable Powers of Attorney for FREE! Call us to schedule an appointment to have your documents reviewed.

 

March is Storm Preparedness month!

Whether you are new to the area or a life long St. Louisan, you know of our horrible tornados and historic flooding.

The important lesson we are reminded of every time is to always be prepared.  Make sure all of your loved ones in your life are prepared for any emergency.

Visit our Resource Center Monday – Friday, 8:30am – 5:00pm for resources on Storm Preparedness and other topics for seniors and our community.

 

January Resolutions

January is a great time to set resolutions for weight loss, exercising and eating better, and spending more time with your loved ones.  It is also a great time to think about those things which we tend to “put off” like estate planning.

No one wakes up and says, “I think I will have a heart attack and die today.”  Or “I think I will have a stroke today and need care for the rest of my life.”

Being prepared gives you and your family the most options to protect yourself, your family and your assets.  Make January or February your time to take control of YOUR estate plan. Make you sure you are PREPARED.

Call today 636-394-0009 to attend on of our FREE Workshops on February 18th at 10:00 a.m. or February 23rd at 6:30 p.m. or you can view all of our upcoming workshops and sign up through our Events page.

Drastic and Harsh Regulations coming to Veterans Benefits

VA BENEFIT NOTICE!

NEW VA REGULATIONS WILL SOON BE IMPLEMENTED THAT WILL MAKE QUALIFYING FOR VA BENEFITS VERY CHALLENGING!

In the next couple of months, new rules are going to be implemented by the Veterans Administration that will make qualifying for the Non-Service Connected benefit (also known as “Aid and Attendance”) very challenging.                      

The Pension Benefit helps pay for unreimbursed medical expenses (not covered by Medicare or a Medicare Supplement) for Veterans and their surviving spouse.  The new regulations will make this benefit available to fewer Veterans and/or their spouses.

ANY VETERAN OR SURVIVING SPOUSE WHO BELIEVES
THEY WILL BE IN NEED OF CARE WITHIN THE NEXT THREE YEARS
MUST ACT QUICKLY.

For the first time, specific asset limitations for qualifying will be put in place. Under the new proposed regulations, a limit of $119,220 of ASSETS AND INCOME for either a married couple or single individual will be allowed.  While your house will continue to not be a countable asset, there will now be a TWO ACRES LIMIT on the acreage your home.  If you live on a farm or a large tract of land, this will be a huge challenge for you to receive the Pension Benefit!

The regulations will also establish a three-year look-back provision and “transfer penalty” similar to Medicaid.  Currently, if the Veteran Administration says you have to many assets to qualify for the Pension Benefit, it is an easy fix to set up a “Veterans Trust”, transfer the assets into the trust, and you will immediately qualify for the Pension Benefit.  Under the new regulations, Veterans or their surviving spouse who transfer assets within three years of applying for benefits will be subject to a “penalty period” that can last as long as TEN YEARS.

There is a complex calculation to determine the penalty period.  However, the penalty period for a surviving spouse would be almost TWICE as long as the penalty period for a Veteran who transfers the same amount of assets into a trust.

THE  REGULATIONS COULD TAKE AFFECT ANYTIME!

We BELIEVE, but CANNOT promise, that any “Veterans Trust” established BEFORE the effective date of the new regulations will not be subject to the new rules.

WE CANNOT GUARANTEE THIS because the regulations and the effective date have NOT been finalized! We are alerting you to these changes so that you MAY have an opportunity to create a trust BEFORE the new regulations are put into place, thereby, hopefully avoiding the new restrictions.

A VERY LIMITED NUMBER OF TRUSTS CAN BE COMPLETED

BEFORE THE CHANGES HAPPEN! 

A VERY LIMITED NUMBER of Veteran Trusts can realistically be completed due to a time line of having the initial conferences, designing the trust, signing the trust, and for you to have time to transfer your assets into the name of the trust before the rules change and these horrible new regulations go into place.

THE NEW REGULATIONS ARE LIFE CHANGING!

PLEASE understand we are not trying to “drum up business.”  What we are trying to do is WARN people we have previously talked to that did not want to undertake setting up a Vet Trust in the past because they felt they had time.  We want you to know and understand TIME IS RUNNING OUT!  There is no longer the possibility of waiting to set up a trust until you or your loved one needs care!  We have special relationships with our Veteran clients and we have always been advocates for Veterans to get the benefits they deserve.

Setting up a Vet Trust NOW could mean the difference between having enough money to afford assisted living instead of moving to a nursing home!

DON’T DELAY!  
CALL VOUGA ELDER LAW TODAY
at 636-394-0009 TODAY to schedule a FREE, no-obligation, initial conference. 

5 Facts about Pearl Harbor and the USS Arizona

At 7:55 a.m. Hawaii time (12:55 p.m. EST) on December 7, 1941, Japanese fighter planes attacked the U.S. base at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, launching one of the deadliest attacks in American history. The assault, which lasted less than two hours, claimed the lives of more than 2,500 people, wounded 1,000 more and damaged or destroyed 18 American ships and nearly 300 airplanes. Almost half of the casualties at Pearl Harbor occurred on the naval battleship USS Arizona, which was hit four times by Japanese bombers. As we commemorate the anniversary of this “date which will live in infamy,” as President Franklin D. Roosevelt described it on December 8, 1941, explore five little-known facts about the USS Arizona and the attack that plunged America into war.

1. Twenty-three sets of brothers died aboard the USS Arizona.
There were 37 confirmed pairs or trios of brothers assigned to the USS Arizona on December 7, 1941. Of these 77 men, 62 were killed, and 23 sets of brothers died. Only one full set of brothers, Kenneth and Russell Warriner, survived the attack; Kenneth was away at flight school in San Diego on that day and Russell was badly wounded but recovered. Both members of the ship’s only father-and-son pair, Thomas Augusta Free and his son William Thomas Free, were killed in action.

Though family members often served on the same ship before World War II, U.S. officials attempted to discourage the practice after Pearl Harbor. However, no official regulations were established, and by the end of the war hundreds of brothers had fought—and died¬—together. The five Sullivan brothers of Waterloo, Iowa, for instance, jointly enlisted after learning that a friend, Bill Ball, had died aboard the USS Arizona; Their only condition upon enlistment was that they be assigned to the same ship. In November 1942, all five siblings were killed in action when their light cruiser, the USS Juneau, was sunk during the Battle of Guadalcanal in the Solomon Islands.

2. The USS Arizona’s entire band was lost in the attack.
Almost half of the casualties at Pearl Harbor occurred on the naval battleship USS Arizona, which was hit four times by Japanese bombers and eventually sank. Among the 1,177 crewmen killed were all 21 members of the Arizona’s band, known as U.S. Navy Band Unit (NBU) 22. Most of its members were up on deck preparing to play music for the daily flag raising ceremony when the attack began. They instantly moved to man their battle positions beneath the ship’s gun turret. At no other time in American history has an entire military band died in action.

The night before the attack, NBU 22 had attended the latest round of the annual “Battle of Music” competition between military bands from U.S. ships based at Pearl Harbor. Contrary to some reports, NBU 22 did not perform, having already qualified for the finals set to be held on December 20, 1941. Following the assault, the unit was unanimously declared the winner of that year’s contest, and the award was permanently renamed the USS Arizona Band Trophy.

3. Fuel continues to leak from the USS Arizona’s wreckage.
On December 6, 1941, the USS Arizona took on a full load of fuel—nearly 1.5 million gallons—in preparation for its scheduled trip to the mainland later that month. The next day, much of it fed the explosion and subsequent fires that destroyed the ship following its attack by Japanese bombers. However, despite the raging fire and ravages of time, some 500,000 gallons are still slowly seeping out of the ship’s submerged wreckage: Nearly 70 years after its demise, the USS Arizona continues to spill up to 9 quarts of oil into the harbor each day. In the mid-1990s, environmental concerns led the National Park Service to commission a series of site studies to determine the long-term effects of the oil leakage.

Some scientists have warned of a possible “catastrophic” eruption of oil from the wreckage, which they believe would cause extensive damage to the Hawaiian shoreline and disrupt U.S. naval functions in the area. The NPS and other governmental agencies continue to monitor the deterioration of the wreck site but are reluctant to perform extensive repairs or modifications due to the Arizona’s role as a “war grave.” In fact, the oil that often coats the surface of the water surrounding the ship has added an emotional gravity for many who visit the memorial and is sometimes referred to as the “tears of the Arizona,” or “black tears.”

4. Some former crewmembers have chosen the USS Arizona as their final resting place.
The bonds between the crewmembers of the USS Arizona have lasted far beyond the ship’s loss on December 7, 1941. Since 1982, the U.S. Navy has allowed survivors of the USS Arizona to be interred in the ship’s wreckage upon their deaths. Following a full military funeral at the Arizona memorial, the cremated remains are placed in an urn and then deposited by divers beneath one of the Arizona’s gun turrets. To date, more than 30 Arizona crewmen who survived Pearl Harbor have chosen the ship as their final resting place. Crewmembers who served on the ship prior to the attack may have their ashes scattered above the wreck site, and those who served on other vessels stationed at Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941, may have their ashes scattered above their former ships. As of November 2011, only 18 of the 355 crewmen who survived the bombing of the USS Arizona are known to be alive.

5. A memorial was built at the USS Arizona site, thanks in part to Elvis Presley.
After the USS Arizona sank, its superstructure and main armament were salvaged and reused to support the war effort, leaving its hull, two gun turrets and the remains of more than 1,000 crewmen submerged in less than 40 feet of water. In 1949 the Pacific War Memorial Commission was established to create a permanent tribute to those who had lost their lives in the attack on Pearl Harbor, but it wasn’t until 1958 that President Dwight D. Eisenhower signed legislation to create a national memorial. The funds to build it came from both the public sector and private donors, including one unlikely source. In March 1961, entertainer Elvis Presley, who had recently finished a two-year stint in the U.S. Army, performed a benefit concert at Pearl Harbor’s Block Arena that raised over $50,000—more than 10 percent of the USS Arizona Memorial’s final cost. The monument was officially dedicated on May 30, 1962, and attracts more than 1 million visitors each year.

Image caption: Aerial view of the USS Arizona Memorial at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. The ship’s wreckage has been leaking oil, visible in the upper left, for nearly 70 years.

Information and image provided by History.com

Thank You Veterans!

There are many types of Heroes, but the true Heroes are our Veterans! We are honored to be able to help Veterans get the benefits they deserve and are grateful for each and every one of them!!

Rick’s father, Jim, is a 98 year old World War II Navy Veteran, who served as a machinist mate aboard a destroyer, the USS Philip, from 1942 to 1945. Rick’s Dad was one of the lucky ones who came home. Jim’s brother, Roger, his only sibling, wasn’t as lucky; he was killed fighting in France. We are especially grateful for these two Veterans.

From all of us at Vouga Elder Law, Thank You and Happy Veterans Day!

  • In 1954, President Eisenhower officially changed the name of the holiday from Armistice Day to Veterans Day.
  • In 1968, the Uniform Holidays Bill was passed by Congress, which moved the celebration of Veterans Day to the fourth Monday in October. The law went into effect in 1971, but in 1975 President Ford returned Veterans Day to November 11, due to the important historical significance of the date.
  • Britain, France, Australia and Canada also commemorate the veterans of World Wars I and II on or near November 11th: Canada has Remembrance Day, while Britain has Remembrance Sunday (the second Sunday of November). In Europe, Britain and the Commonwealth countries it is common to observe two minutes of silence at 11 a.m. every November 11.

Information provided by www.history.com